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Los Angeles Times Articles

The Los Angeles Times was the first major media outlet to publish stories about the tragic death of Eliza Jane Scovill in September 2005. This page contains this story, follow-up stories, and a number of letters written to the newspaper, whether published by them or not.

The LA Times has, unfortunately, decided to take a simplistic view of the story, siding with the coroner’s conclusion that Eliza Jane died of AIDS-related pneumonia, dismissing the conclusion of Dr. Al-Bayati that she died from an allergic reaction to amoxicillin (penicillin).

Charges Dropped Against EJ’s Doctor, Investigation into Coroner Launched The story behind the LA Times report on Dr. Paul M. FleissMarsha Gold
 A report in the October 9th 2007 edition of the Los Angeles Times announced the Medical Board of California has dropped charges of gross negligence against one of Eliza Jane’s three pediatricians, Dr. Paul Fleiss, after a year-long investigation into the highly publicized case. According to the news item by Carla Hall, “The board did not find [Fleiss] grossly negligent in the care of any patient,” including Eliza Jane Scovill, and “acknowledged in its decision that it was flooded with over a hundred letters from generations of patients and parents in support of Fleiss.” [read more…]
LA County Coroner James Ribe’s Checkered History
 A summary of some of the court cases in which James Ribe has changed his testimony is shown at ej-ribe.html.
…What I can't understand…is the refusal of the scientific community to engage in dialogue that explores legitimate questions…Donna Flagg, Principal, The Krysalis Group
 To Charles Ornstein
LA Times

Dear Charles,

I have been following the Maggiore story and fully understand that every story has two sides and that it’s human nature to become stuck on the side that makes us “right.” What I can’t understand however, is the refusal of the scientific community to engage in dialogue that explores legitimate questions. This is an industry in a country that claims to link science to discovery. In that context, the adamancy of a segment of our so-called scientists who fail to consider and respond to emerging questions about the HIV=AIDS hypothesis doesn’t make any sense, unless, of course there is something to hide. That unwillingness to consider an open debate in and of itself is suspicious. At a minimum, why wouldn’t a study be conducted that follows people (like Christine Maggiore) who are HIV positive, chose not to take the drugs, yet have long outlived the HIV=AIDS death sentence? It is such a basic question. What happens in the absence of the drugs?

So, we have two sides. On the one hand we have people who have been labeled “dissidents” who don’t want to take drugs. On the other, we have an industry that generates billions by forcing these drugs on people and treating them like criminals if they don’t oblige. Yes, the stakes are high. The dissidents have their health riding on it and the “establishment” has an empire to consider. But really it’s a survival story for both. Whether it’s the people belonging to the establishment preserving their wealth, prestige, ego and reputations, or those who want to preserve their health and freedom, both sides’ lives depend on which argument prevails. As a result, the debate itself goes nowhere.

Unfortunately, we have other societal structures that suffer from this same syndrome of ignorance and arrogance, which means that we end up being a country led by individuals who think that their puerile refusal to listen and respond to alternative views is acceptable. Deluded or deliberate, it doesn’t matter. The results are the same and they speak for themselves.

Thank you,

 

Donna Flagg Principal
The Krysalis Group, LLC

LA Times Reporter Charles Ornstein talks to Christine Maggiore
 LA Times reporter Charles Ornstein phoned Christine Maggiore to obtain information for an article following the announcement by the LA County Coroner that they were closing their file on the death of Eliza Jane Scovill. The interview is available in Windows Media format and as an MP3. Both are about 8 MB in size.
…I admire the way that your family has fought for the truth, and for your rights as parents, even in the tragic loss of your daughter…Kellie, San Fernando Valley, California
 My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family on the loss of your gorgeous daughter. I have been following your story, the Los Angeles Times’ badly biased version of it, and the blogosphere’s truly insensitive comments regarding your daughter’s death. I have noticed that many bloggers are acting on false information, such as the “fact” that Christine is HIV+, when it has been said, over and over, that her tests have been negative, inconclusive, and positive. And yet, this misinformation, along with much other misinformation, has been used to vilify you and instill fear into parents everywhere. After all, if parents cannot make informed decisions about the care of the children that they bring into the world, then we are truly living in Plato’s or Skinner’s world, a world in which parents give their children over to the state at birth.
I admire the way that your family has fought for the truth, and for your rights as parents, even in the tragic loss of your daughter. Your words have made me think, something that those who condemn you seem incapable of. I can only imagine that it's horrible enough to lose a child, but to have people say such terrible things about you as parents? It’s chilling indeed to think that such truly mean and closed-minded people, of all political stripes, walk the earth each day.
My own personal saturation point was reached today, when my husband pointed out the article in which you were “allowed” to keep your son (how thoughtful of the government and media, being that they’ve put you in such utter contempt during your mourning) but that Dr. Paul Fleiss is now being charged with “gross negligence.” One of the reasons that we chose Dr. Fleiss when I was pregnant with our first child is because he has this novel idea of allowing parents to decide what's best for their children. Well, evidently this idea must go, at least according to the Medical Board of California. I’m quite disappointed in Dr. Jay Gordon’s wimping out, or seeming to anyway – perhaps the Times misquoted him, but I am quite proud of Dr. Fleiss for standing up for what he believes – in trusting parents to make the best decisions for their children. Apparently, he’s becoming a dinosaur in that respect.
You know, of course, how wonderful it is to have Dr. Fleiss as a pediatrician. I have found that his loving, caring, and devotion to freedom permeates his office. He has given us such wonderful advice regarding our children. It hurts to know that people who have only read the Los Angeles Times' account and various Internet bloggers are trying to deface such a wonderful, caring doctor. Although I've encountered some fabulous doctors in Los Angeles, he is truly one of the best. His focus is on the child and what is best for the child. He gives gentle advice to parents and allows parents to make their own decisions. Apparently, such freedom of thought and action is a bit too much for those who are conditioned to love the ever-increasing socialism in the U.S.
Like you, I am saddened by the charges that Dr. Fleiss faces, but then again, seeing what is happening to Dr. Fleiss, and how media and government have treated you, makes me understand how unpopular and threatening dissenting thought can be. It’s horrible that in the supposedly freest country on earth, one is encouraged in group think and dissenters are condemned.
Many thanks to your family, and to Dr. Fleiss, for being the brave souls that you are!
…I admire the way that your family has fought for the truth, and for your rights as parents, even in the tragic loss of your daughter…Kellie, San Fernando Valley, California
 My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family on the loss of your gorgeous daughter. I have been following your story, the Los Angeles Times’ badly biased version of it, and the blogosphere’s truly insensitive comments regarding your daughter’s death. I have noticed that many bloggers are acting on false information, such as the “fact” that Christine is HIV+, when it has been said, over and over, that her tests have been negative, inconclusive, and positive. And yet, this misinformation, along with much other misinformation, has been used to vilify you and instill fear into parents everywhere. After all, if parents cannot make informed decisions about the care of the children that they bring into the world, then we are truly living in Plato’s or Skinner’s world, a world in which parents give their children over to the state at birth.
I admire the way that your family has fought for the truth, and for your rights as parents, even in the tragic loss of your daughter. Your words have made me think, something that those who condemn you seem incapable of. I can only imagine that it's horrible enough to lose a child, but to have people say such terrible things about you as parents? It’s chilling indeed to think that such truly mean and closed-minded people, of all political stripes, walk the earth each day.
My own personal saturation point was reached today, when my husband pointed out the article in which you were “allowed” to keep your son (how thoughtful of the government and media, being that they’ve put you in such utter contempt during your mourning) but that Dr. Paul Fleiss is now being charged with “gross negligence.” One of the reasons that we chose Dr. Fleiss when I was pregnant with our first child is because he has this novel idea of allowing parents to decide what's best for their children. Well, evidently this idea must go, at least according to the Medical Board of California. I’m quite disappointed in Dr. Jay Gordon’s wimping out, or seeming to anyway – perhaps the Times misquoted him, but I am quite proud of Dr. Fleiss for standing up for what he believes – in trusting parents to make the best decisions for their children. Apparently, he’s becoming a dinosaur in that respect.
You know, of course, how wonderful it is to have Dr. Fleiss as a pediatrician. I have found that his loving, caring, and devotion to freedom permeates his office. He has given us such wonderful advice regarding our children. It hurts to know that people who have only read the Los Angeles Times' account and various Internet bloggers are trying to deface such a wonderful, caring doctor. Although I've encountered some fabulous doctors in Los Angeles, he is truly one of the best. His focus is on the child and what is best for the child. He gives gentle advice to parents and allows parents to make their own decisions. Apparently, such freedom of thought and action is a bit too much for those who are conditioned to love the ever-increasing socialism in the U.S.
Like you, I am saddened by the charges that Dr. Fleiss faces, but then again, seeing what is happening to Dr. Fleiss, and how media and government have treated you, makes me understand how unpopular and threatening dissenting thought can be. It’s horrible that in the supposedly freest country on earth, one is encouraged in group think and dissenters are condemned.
Many thanks to your family, and to Dr. Fleiss, for being the brave souls that you are!
L.A. County D.A. Won't Act in Girl's AIDS-Related DeathCharles Ornstein, LA Times
 The Los Angeles County district attorney's office said Friday that it would not file criminal neglect charges against prominent HIV skeptic Christine Maggiore, whose daughter died last year of what the county coroner ruled was AIDS-related pneumonia.

But in a separate development, the Medical Board of California filed an accusation this week against one of the 3-year-old girl's doctors, citing gross negligence in his treatment of her…[more]…

LA Coroner Ends InvestigationChristine Maggiore
 On the anniversary of the release of Eliza Jane’s autopsy report, as I was watering the Bougainvillea plant immortalized in Elle magazine, Charles Ornstein of the LA Times phoned requesting an interview on today’s announcement from the District Attorney's office about charges in the EJ case.
My heart began to pound. “What announcement?” I asked, wondering if these would be my last words before squad cars rounded the corner and I was handcuffed and hauled away with the hose still running.
Instead, I learned from Ornstein (who always seems to know more about my life than I do) that the District Attorney closed the criminal investigation against me today with no charges filed.
After all I've been through, I had only one thought in mind: Get a tape recorder.
The conversation I taped with Ornstein will post to the JusticeForEJ.com web site as soon as I can figure out how to do that, so at least one uncensored, unedited, unadulterated version of the facts will exist in the public record.
I have no idea what will appear in the LA Times tomorrow, but get the feeling it will focus on what Ornstein told me when he called back an hour later: Dr Paul Fleiss – our honest, brave, and kind hearted pediatrician – has been charged with negligence by the state medical board for his handling of Eliza Jane's non-existent pneumonia.
Robin and I are devastated to learn of this horrific new injustice and hope that those of you who know and love Dr Fleiss will join us in supporting him and his courageous support of informed choice.

Thank you,

Christine

Letter to the LA TimesDr. Mohammed Al-Bayati
 

In your December 9 story on “HIV skeptic” Christine Maggiore, author Daniel Costello attributes a comment to me that I never made. According to his article, I plan to bill Maggiore (at a discount) for my review of her daughter’s autopsy. This statement is attributable to either a misunderstanding or a fabrication as I said no such thing during our interview. I took Maggiore’s case with no intention of charging the family and do not offer discount coupons for autopsy reviews as the article implies. The way Costello writes, it would appear that the conviction in Maryland of Kathleen Butcher occurred as a result of or despite my review of the autopsy. In actuality, Kathleen Butcher’s family contacted me two years after her conviction, and to the best of my knowledge, the review is part of new evidence presented as part of current legal efforts on Kathleen Butcher’s behalf.

The Los Angeles Times Run AroundJamie Gold, Readers' Representative, LA Times
 

Dear Christine,

The letters department [of the LA Times] forwarded to the readers’ representative office your letter because, as before, it alleges errors (“omissions and misrepresentations”) in the Dec. 9 article. The letters department did not publish your previous letter because editors in that department do not publish letters that dispute facts. If facts in an article are wrong, a correction would be published. However, no correction is warranted in this case. As we discussed before, your letter can present your perspective, but letters are not forums for disputing facts, so in its present form, the letter cannot run.

Jamie Gold, Readers’ Representative

Our Thoughts: Once again, the Los Angeles Times has refused to publish a letter from Christine Maggiore, the subject of three articles that include errors, omissions and misrepresentations.

As occurred with Maggiore’s previous attempts at drafting an acceptable letter following the Times’ September 23 article “A Mother’s Denial, A Daughter’s Death,” Reader’s Representative Jamie Gold cites the policy that silences challenge. In the above email message to Maggiore, Gold reminds her that the paper does not “publish letters that dispute facts.” And as with the last run around, facts are defined by the LA Times as any claim or statement contained in the article itself or a reporter’s notes, whether or not the notes or the article is correct.

In this case, Maggiore was informed her letter of reply could not mention the fact that Dr Al-Bayati’s review of her daughter’s autopsy had been accepted for publication by a medical journal with an editorial board of some 20 medical doctors and scientists because reporter Daniel Costello felt “the journal exhibited an ideology opposing mainstream medical thinking.” Apparently, Costello’s opinion of the journal renders the fact of its publication of Al-Bayati’s review a non-fact or, worse, a fact that disputes the LA Times’ notion of fact.

I suppose this circular makes logic makes sense in the world according to Daniel Costello, Charles Orenstein and the Los Angeles Times...

HIV Skeptic Takes Her Case to TV AudienceDaniel Costello & Charles Ornstein Los Angeles Times
 The LA Times ran a story which largely echoed the ABC Primetime TV show. They continued attempts to discredit Al-Bayati, by noting that he does not have an MD (but admitting that he does have a doctorate (PhD) in comparative pathology from UC Davis. They used the pejorative term “denialist” to describe the fact that he has questioned the connection between HIV and AIDS. If science is about questioning current beliefs to develop new and better theories, why is a bad thing to question an established dogma?

The article clearly favors the LA County Coroner James Ribe, quoting him saying “The findings are clear-cut, I’m afraid, and the findings are unequivocal…The body shows what it shows. The organs show what they show. That hasn’t changed before, since or ever.” They did not appear to have challenged him to provide additional evidence. They asked an establishment AIDS doctor, Dr. Harry Vinters, chief of neuropathology at UCLA Medical Center, for his opinion and, not surprisingly, he supported the coroner saying that the diagnosis “is really quite straightforward. It’s not a subtle or tricky diagnosis.” They did not provide any evidence for readers beyond this statement of opinion.

Letter to the LA TimesChristine Maggiore
 Consistent with previous articles about me appearing in the Times, your December 9th story contains several striking omissions and misrepresentations. To cite one example, Dr. Mohammed Al-Bayati’s review of my daughter’s autopsy did not necessitate viewing of pathology slides since the slides are not in dispute, a point explained to, but apparently ignored by Costello and Orenstein as part of efforts to insinuate negligence.

In their desire to depict Al-Bayati as biased, Costello and Orenstein fail to mention that his analysis of my daughter’s death has been published in a medical journal whose review board consists of 20 physicians and scientists with no association to Alive & Well.

Further obscuring the facts, your dynamic duo suggest Al-Bayati’s work resulted in the conviction of a Maryland babysitter when in fact his autopsy analysis in this case was commissioned two years after the woman’s incarceration and is being presented as evidence in her bid for a new trial. I encourage readers feeling dizzy from all the spins to stop in for a check up at www.JusticeForEJ.com.

Full Letter (too long for the LA Times)Christine Maggiore
 “A Mother’s Denial,” your article on the death of my daughter, Eliza Jane Scovill, breezed past a number of crucial facts in its rush to publication and judgment.

Medical records show my daughter did not exhibit symptoms consistent with the coroner’s determination of pneumonia, AIDS-related or otherwise. The three pediatricians who examined Eliza Jane in the days before her death all noted clear lungs. At a doctor visit on May 14, the day before she died, no cough or respiratory congestion was evident. When my daughter collapsed at home the next evening following her fourth dose of antibiotic, she did not have the blue lips or fingertips suggestive of life-threatening pneumonia.

After being transported to a near-by hospital by ambulance, emergency room doctors took a series of chest X-rays that revealed nothing to account for her dire condition. All other tests run that terrible night left ER doctors without an explanation for my daughter’s death. For this reason, Eliza Jane was brought to the Los Angeles County Coroner for an autopsy.

During an autopsy performed on May 18, my daughter’s lungs were carefully examined, weighed and measured. The coroner released her body to a mortuary the following day having found no apparent cause of death.

Just before Eliza Jane’s memorial service on May 29, my husband contacted the coroner’s office for an update on our daughter’s case and spoke directly with the medical examiner. She informed him they had yet to discover what took our little girl’s life, and having eliminated the common and obvious, they would now go through a check-list that included investigation of such unsettling possibilities as chemical toxins and poisons. That same week, a curious friend phoned the coroner’s office and asked if HIV tests were routinely administered in cases of unexplained death. He was told that “the symptoms of AIDS are so obvious” it’s not necessary to run HIV tests on all patients referred with no apparent cause.

On June 28, one of my daughter’s pediatricians received a call from the coroner’s office demanding to know if he was aware of my book and HIV status. Before hanging up, the doctor was threatened with a subpoena. Despite the apparent new awareness of my HIV positivity and controversial book, it still took three more months for the corner to decide upon a diagnosis of AIDS-related pneumonia.

Given the circumstances, we have questions about the medical and scientific basis for the coroner’s conclusion. Did Eliza Jane get a diagnosis by association or is there incontrovertible clinical evidence for AIDS-related pneumonia? Did our daughter, unlike her father and brother, actually test HIV positive? We won’t know until the conclusion of an independent investigation in three weeks. In the meantime, my family must not only endure the pain and devastation of our horrendous loss, but the world’s speculation and scrutiny. We only hope that when all the facts are in, the LA Times will rush to publish the rest of our story.

Shortened LetterChristine Maggiore
 Re: ’A Mother’s Denial“ (Saturday September 24)

In response to your article “A Mother’s Denial,“ medical records show my daughter did not exhibit symptoms consistent with pneumonia. On her last doctor visit, Eliza-Jane had no cough or respiratory congestion. After collapsing the next day following antibiotic administration, ER doctors performed a series of chest X-rays that revealed nothing. After careful examination of her lungs during a May autopsy, the coroner found no apparent cause of death.

One month and no cause later, the coroner’s office called her pediatrician demanding to know if he knew about my book and HIV status. Despite their discovery, it took three more months for the coroner to decide my daughter died of AIDS-pneumonia.

Is Eliza-Jane’s a diagnosis by association? Unlike her father and brother, did she actually test HIV positive? While we wait for the conclusion of an independent investigation, interested readers may follow our side of the story at ejlovetour.com.

What Really Happened to Eliza Jane?Christine Maggiore
 On Saturday September 24, 2005, The Los Angeles Times ran a front-page story on the death of my three year-old child, Eliza Jane Scovill, under the condemnatory headline, “A Mother’s Denial, A Daughter’s Death.” My reply to the extensive article, as yet unpublished, was restricted to a 150-word letter to the editor.

Below please find my 149 words on the subject followed by the full text of my original letter to The LA Times.

Son to Remain With HIV SkepticsLA Times
 “…After reviewing recent test results from three labs showing that the boy is HIV-negative, the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services is expecting to close its child endangerment investigation, officials said Wednesday.…”
Published Letters to the LA TimesLA Times
 Two letters that were published by the LA Times are linked above. Many supportive letters were never published.
Letter to the LA TimesMira de Vries, Association for Medical and Therapeutic Self-Determination, The Netherlands
 Times’ Staff Writers Charles Ornstein and Daniel Costello are jumping the gun when they suggest that 3-1/2-year-old Eliza Jane Scovill would not have died if she had been on antiretroviral drugs. The child’s HIV status isn’t known. What we do know is that antiretroviral drugs are responsible for disfiguring, devastating, and often deadly side effects in adults as well as children/
Letter to the LA TimesDr. Harvey Bialy, Resident Scholar, Inst. of Biotechnology, Autonomous National University of Mexico Dr. Peter Duesberg, University of California at Berkeley
 This is in response to the story you published yesterday regarding the death of the daughter of Christine Maggiore and Robin Scovill.

In order to have a diagnosis of ‘aids related pneumonia’, two conditions must be met. The patient must be HIV antibody positive, and there must be a clinical pneumonia. Whether Eliza Jane was in fact antibody-positive is information that neither the LA Times nor the coroner’s office has as yet made public. However, according to all reports it is acknowledged the child suffered none of the textbook symptoms of pneumonia, and had previously been in excellent health for several years. Thus the crucial second condition appears completely unsatisfied. (A post mortem finding of PCP in the lungs means nothing since it is 100% ubiquitous in human beings). Thus we are left to ponder the only significant fact, and it is one of omission, in your story. On what basis did the coroner conclude the child died of ‘AIDS related pneumonia’?

After more than 20 years of attempting to get straight answers about HIV/AIDS from so-called authorities, I am less than sanguine that this latest, simple query will be satisfactorily answered.

Letter to the LA TimesRev. Dr. Michael Ellner President, HEAL, New York
 Over the last twenty-two years I have had personal contact with thousands of people who have been diagnosed with AIDS-related pneumonia. Congested lungs and fevers are symptomatic of pneumonia. Eliza Jane’s lungs were clear and she didn’t have a fever according to the three doctors who diagnosed her with an ear infection. Based on this information one wonders how the Los Angeles County coroner came up with AIDS-related pneumonia as the cause of death.

You don't need to be a doctor, scientist or medical examiner to realize that Eliza Jane was more likely the victim of a severe adverse reaction to amoxicillin rather than the victim of HIV.

Christine Maggiore and Robin Scovill made decisions based on the recommendation of their doctors as any responsible caring parents would. They have suffered enough pain over the loss of their child without being second guessed by authorities.

Furthermore there is not one study showing that a baby is at risk for an active infection as a result of breastfeeding. In addition to being the perfect food for babies, breast milk is nature’s way of passing on a mother’s immunity to her children via the antibodies that are present in her breast milk.

I find it alarming that Ornstein and Costello reported that “mainstream AIDS organizations, medical experts and ethicists are confounded and distressed by those who question HIV-AIDS” and that you neglected to report that these same organizations and experts stand to lose everything if the HIV-AIDS mythologies are scrutinized.

It is contemptible that the AIDS establishment is using this tragic death to discredit anyone and everyone who challenge the conventional, politically correct views on HIV/AIDS.

Letter to the LA TimesSascha Sarnoff, Health Advocacy in the Public Interest, Santa Barbara
 Thank you for covering this very sad and important story despite a misleading tabloid title, which was not in step with the balanced writing of article.

As a longtime friend of the Maggiore/Scovill family, and I have been fortunate to watch them lovingly and wisely raise their two healthy children, Charlie and Eliza Jane (EJ). As this case unfolds I feel that additional information is needed to help LA Times readers understand the case more fully and set the record straight on numerous key points, including several inaccuracies found in the 8-page cover story about the tragic death of Eliza Jane Scovill.

It is true, as stated in the Times article, that the child died within hours after being prescribed, and ingesting, amoxicillin. It is grossly irresponsible to say, as Dr. James Oleske said in his interview in the Times article, that “This was a preventable death.” A simple Library of Medicine review of the words “amoxicillin, anaphylaxis, symptoms” retrieves a list of adverse reactions to amoxicillin including, vomiting, and sudden death, which were exactly the symptoms, according to the coroner’s office, and the L.A. Times Press release, that Eliza Jane developed hours after taking the drug. Having never examined Eliza Jane, does Dr. Oleske think that he indeed could have prevented an amoxicillin-induced anaphylactic reaction (if she had been properly evaluated)? Antibiotic adverse reactions do happen, causing serious injury or death, this is a fact.

It is also true as the article states that flu shots, mandatory hepatitis B vaccinations, other recent vaccinations, pregnancy, and common viral infections could all lead to a false-positive test result. In fact, by doing a comprehensive search one finds over 70 reasons other than an “HIV” infection for a false positive test result, and 46 known disease syndromes that can affect test results. Conditions like warts, malaria, long-term drug and alcohol use, receipt of gamma globulin, blood transfusions, leprosy, tuberculosis, bacterial and fungal infections, autoimmune diseases, kidney failure, alpha interferon therapy in hemodialysis patients, various cancers, herpes, non-specific upper respiratory tract infection, various anemias, hepatitis B, tetanus, hypergammaglobulinemia, rheumatoid arthritis, vaccinations, and many other conditions and or treatments. Many of these can be found on “HIV” test kit inserts, and on the CDC’s HIV/AIDS websites.

Although the LA Times reports “Federal officials say that HIV tests detect antibodies to the virus and are accurate predictors of who is infected,” many of the test-kits themselves contradict that very statement. “ELISA testing alone cannot be used to diagnose AIDS.” (Abbott Laboratory’s ELISA test kit insert, 1997). “Do not use this kit as the sole basis for HIV infection.” (Epitope, a maker for one of the Western Blot kits, 1997), and Ê“The Amplicor HIV-1 monitor test is not intended to be used as a screening test for HIV, nor as a diagnostic test to confirm the presence of HIV infection.” (Roche Amplicor test kit insert, 1996).

Dr. Peter Havens, a professor of pediatrics and epidemiology at the Medical College of Wisconsin, was quoted by the LA Times article that: “contrairian HIV theories promoted on about 400 websites are bogus baloney,” and that, “It’s all pseudoscience,” and that, “They choose one paper and deny the existence of 100 others.” One could ask the dogmatic Professor of Pediatrics whether he believes that The New England Journal of Medicine, The Lancet, the journal AIDS, and The Journal of Virology advance “bogus baloney,” “pseudoscience,” or “contrarian views”, or publish “selected papers”. Or should we take serious, articles in these journals that describe, for example, the extreme toxicity of AZT and the protease inhibitors, and the rapid advance to death that infants exhibit when their mothers are given these toxic, failed cancer chemotherapeutic compounds.

In the days following EJ’s passing, we need a growing willingness to listen to unfamiliar information and ponder new points of view to better protect the health of our tiniest citizens from medical error and misdiagnosis.

Letter to the LA TimesPaul Lineback, Grant’s Pass, Oregon
 The LA Times article, “A Mother’s Denial, a Daughter’s Death” (9/24/05) skips this vital question: How did the coroner determine Eliza Jane had AIDS? It’s crucial because dissenting scientists have meticulously shown assumptions underlying HIV tests to be false. Instead of confronting the issue, however, the authors quote labels like “pseudo science” that attack dissenter credibility. Such labels are ironic when compared to circumventions of science employed by HIV researchers that include science-by-press-release, avoiding debate, and suppressing dissent. These acts seem intended to conceal the tautologies that generate objectionable proof of HIV, and hide discrepancies to the hypothesis.

Concerns about the negative potential of science prompted Karl Popper to devise a mechanism called ‘falsification’ to prevent science misuse: Unless a hypothesis is made vulnerable to the evidence against it, the hypothesis is not scientific but ideological. In contrast to this principle the HIV hypothesis has been protected from falsification.

The dysfunctional development of AIDS science and the cogent criticisms of HIV exist, and skepticism will continue as long as falsification is evaded. Science is not merely about seeking confirming evidence. Some ethicists and policy bureaucrats are apparently blinded to this, but it points towards an ethical priority of informed consent.

Letter to the LA TimesChristine Johnston, Pasadena, California Michael Wright, Norman, Oklahoma
 Christine Maggiore is being condemned for not treating her daughter Eliza Jane for HIV. Yet one wonders how the coroner was able to make a determination of “AIDS-related pneumonia.” No pediatricians had diagnosed pneumonia or noted its symptoms in the girl. Eliza Jane had never been tested, and the scientific literature supports the conclusion that post-mortem blood testing for HIV is not reliable and likely to yield false-positive results.

Maggiore’s HIV-infected status is questionable as well. According to the article, AIDS experts state: “HIV tests are accurate predictors of who is infected.” Yet the package inserts of all HIV antibody test kits plainly state that “there is no recognized standard for establishing the presence and absence of HIV-1 antibody in human blood.” Our search of the scientific literature identified over 70 diseases and conditions documented to cause false positive results.

A review of the Physicians’ Desk Reference suggests that adverse effects of the drug amoxicillin were the true cause of the child's death. Vomiting and gastrointestinal disorders are reported in the list of side effects. She was vomiting the day after being given the drug, and died the next day.

A Mother’s Denial, a Daughter’s DeathCharles Ornstein & Daniel Costello LA Times
 This front page story by LA Times reporters Charles Ornstein and Daniel Costello appeared to accept, without questioning, the LA county coroner’s conclusion that Eliza Jane died of “AIDS-related pneumonia” even before Christine and Robin had received a copy of the coroner’s report.

This front page story also reported that several mainstream doctors had suggested that her parents should have been forced to test the child for HIV and that stronger antibiotics (such as Bactrim) should have been used.

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Last updated: July 18, 2008.